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Best Video Card??

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15 comments

  • Merle Becker

    Rick, in that Nvidia 3060 is the Open GL installed in or part of that video card. Also was yr. upgraded power supply the 1050 or was that your based before the upgrade.  Thanks  Merle Becker

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  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    Do a search for video card on these forums to see what others have recommend in the recent past.

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  • Bill Hercus

    Good point but looking to be a bit more specific, hopefully.

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  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    This question gets asked frequently enough if he answers will be quite specific. Take a look I can’t look it up for you right now because I’m not at home.

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  • Rick Sammartino Community moderator

    I'm quite happy with my NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 (12.0 GB).

    It was the best I could afford at the time. I made sure it had a lot of Vram so that it will still work for as long as possible.

    Note; I needed to upgrade the power supply (1050W) to accommodate the higher power of this GPU.

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  • Merle Becker

    Rick, in that Nvidia 3060 is the Open GL installed in or part of that video card. Also was yr. upgraded power supply the 1050 or was that your based before the upgrade.  Thanks  Merle Becker

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  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    OpenGL is a library loaded into your OS for the video card to use. Video card drivers MAY include updated OpenGL code but it isn't something that is a part of the card. The card's drivers make calls to the OpenGL routines to do the image processing and display.

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  • Rick Sammartino Community moderator

    Merle,

    Probably what Brian said. I know OpenGL is supported, but I don't know where it came from.

    I upgraded to 1050W. The specs say the GPU needs 650W but need to account for the motherboard, CPU, and everything else as well. My previous P/S was 750W.

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  • Vinny Giannino

    If you are an older store bought computer more than likely you have a low powered power supply and it may not have the required cabling for a modern GPU. As far as "best" the only criteria that's out there is for gaming and I think Nvidea and AMD are roughly the same. I have a RX580 that was I think was first out in 2017 with 8 Gb of VRAM. If I were to buy today I would buy a video card with at least 12 Gb, maybe even 16 Gb of VRAM to make sure it can handle future requirements.

    If you find a video card you're interested in you can go the the Nvidea or AMD website and see what version of OpenCL it can handle. I would imagine that all modern video cards can handle the latest software, whatever is needed. As Rick and Brian said, doing a software update on the video drivers will update what the card can handle.

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  • Ken

    Just a quick comment on power supply requirements for an Nvidia 3060.  The manufacturer's 650 watt spec requires to requirements for supporting the entire system not just the GPU.  A 3060 only draws about 200 watts, even under load.  FYI, I run an RTX 3070 (draws more power than a 3060) and an i5-13600 (which draws considerably more than power than the Ryzen 5600) on a 650 watt power supply with no issues.  BTW, On1 runs great on that system - absolutely no complaints regarding performance.

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  • Konik

    same here, running R5 5600x and nvidia 3060 on a 600W power supply

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  • Lou Gross

    There is a new Nvidia card: RTX 4060 with 8GB of video RAM for $299.  Or the GTX 1060 6GB for $249+. For $229 there is the GTX 1660 Super with 6 GB.  Of course, if you can spend more, there are 12 GB cards (RTX 3060) starting at $329.

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  • Roger Berry

    Hello All,

    A quick FYI first. As of May 27 there are deals on the 30 series Nvidia cards. I am tempted to order the MSI 3060 with 12GB of VRAM for $280 in advance of my planned computer build.

    Now for the TLDR part. However, before I commit, I have questions about the nature of new generation GPUs based on my current (vague) understanding of image processing. The recent addition of AI driven features in ON1 makes the choice especially fraught.

    After many articles and tech driven Youtube views, it seems that constructing images rapidly (frame rates) for video games is one parameter measured and painting lighting effects (ray tracing) is quite another. The Youtube demos about ray tracing escape my eyes, but I don't play video games. Some cards apparently do ray tracing effects quite well, which seems relevant to the AI functions in ON1. My understanding is that one image method is more rote and requires different processing to generate desired pixels, where ray tracing has to calculate effects on those pixels and needs different processing to predict results.

    Many discussions about GPU or CPU powers reflect similar disparities for video image processing. Some processes appear to be CPU-centric due to how calculations are made while GPU processing seems to involve thousands of "cores" doing very simple tasks very fast. To top this all off, I have encountered references to CUDAs vs TENSORS in discussions.

    The key question I am asking the community or ON1 tech if they monitor these things, is what processor is most involved when using the new AI software. Some Youtube sources say the 3060 is just fine for Adobe, but ON1 seems to work differently based on comments I have gleaned. ON1 seems to be much more sophisticated and with AI Resize even more so. I am fortunate to be able to choose whichever works best in GPU or CPU categories, but foolish spending on either is just that. Any tech based answers are welcome.

    I currently have been using a first gen i7 chip that is now 12 years old with a four year old GPU. Only recently have I noticed weird results on Raw 2023, so I just use the 2020 version. As an old dog there are many new tricks that I am still learning on the software. I am finally clear of my job duties and plan to build the new computer to handle the newest ON1 software. Whether I can manage to learn the new capabilities is TBD.

    Thanks in advance.

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  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    Raytracing is just one method of painting an image onto the screen. It involves tracing a ray of light from each pixel back to the (virtual) camera lens through which the scene is viewed. And yes, it takes into account all the objects it encounters along the way and how their color alters the color of the light beam. It involves a lot of calculations so GPUs are good at doing that kind of processing.

    The same for AI. It involves hundreds of thousands of calculations repeated many times to evaluate an image to do whatever type of processing that particular AI has been trained for – sharpening, resizing, masking, etc. Again, this is GPU territory. 

    I'm not into the Windows world as much as I once was so I won't comment on any particular video cards. I'll leave that for the Windows experts.

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  • Vinny Giannino

    Roger,

    Here's my thoughts.

    I would think that most modern video cards are capable of handling Adobe products and ON1 products the same. I think the days of similar computers having issues with ON1 are gone (hopefully!!). In the past people would have issues using similar machines to people who had no issues.

    Personally, I would not worry too much about ray tracing as video games are running at huge frame rates and a photo is not. Yes you may add layers and masks and whatever else but you are not doing it at 75 times a second. Can there or will there be glitches, maybe but I think a powerful enough CPU and GPU with enough memory for both should make ON1 run fine. If you watch task manager when you process a photo you may see the GPU active for a blip or for a long time, more memory and processing speed makes more processes become blips.

    My older GPU with 8Gb of memory seems to run 2023 fine, I would expect if I upgraded to a newer GPU (Nvidea or AMD) that it would work better, if I could detect any change (I assume everything would be faster acting).

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