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Recommendations for a new Laptop to run Photoraw 2020

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12 comments

  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    The problem I see is the GPU too. It only has the built in Intel Iris Plus which means it is using up to 1.5GB of that 16GB for its video memory. You'll be much better off with a system which has the dedicated GPU with its own VRAM.

    For reference I run a 16" 16 GB 2017 MacBookPro. I have my photos on an external SSD where they've been for a couple of system upgrades now. I also have an SSD dedicated to ON1's Scratch space and its PerfectBrowseCache. This is important for the program's performance and because my internal boot drive is only 128GB and there isn't enough from for my PBC. Things can get a little slow when I'm working on a complex image but it is livable considering it's a laptop.

    The things I think you should consider are the additional GPU & the external SSD for the Scratch space/Perfect Browse Cache. Watch the boot drive size too as that isn't upgradeable. Once it fills up down the road an additional external drive for photos and other user documents can be added at little cost.

    One thing to consider if you should decide to switch to Windows is the additional cost of replacing all the Mac software you already own, things like Office and other necessary programs.

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  • John Crowley

    thanks Brian for the comments. 

    I agree the GPU would be pretty weak. Dedicated SSD for scratch space, yes. And external drive for extra storage down the road. 

    Her immediate need is for a new computer for everyday work, email, streaming, web access. Photo editing is secondary.

    What are your thoughts ( or anyone else who'd like to chime in) on adding a external GPU when / if she needs more graphic power?

     

    thks

     

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  • Ray Miles

    Until I upgraded recently, I was running On1 on a 2017 13 inch MacBook Pro with the lower specs and only a 128GB SSD. As suggested by Brian I put my photos on an external 500GB SSD and my scratch disc on a cheap 128GB SSD. I got reasonable performance.

    The only issue was when I switched computers and decided to move my more recent photos to the new internal SSD and consequently lost most of my edits. I am still trying to restore some of them to put together a slideshow for the Day of the Dead today! This is a known bug that has still not been fixed.

    As a sideline, I know countless people who have moved from Windows to Mac, but no-one who would even consider moving the other way!

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  • David Kick

    Hudson Henry moved from Mac to Windows PC. You can get much more bang for the buck with Windows machines. 

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  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    Adding an external GPU later will be more expensive but it will also give you greater options for how powerful a GPU you want to use. Personally, I'd get the laptop with a better GPU now. You can still add another one later. That's just me though.

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  • David Price

    You may have noticed all of the fuss made when Apple announced that they will be leaving Intel behind and moving to their own chips. This won't start to happen until later in 2021 at the earliest. But, in the meantime the fact that people can directly compare the cost of the hardware in a nice new Apple with the same hardware in a Windows 10 based machine, must really hurt Apple.


    Most people seem to fall firmly into the Apple or into the Windows camp. (It is almost as if they learn the one operating system, then are unable to also learn the other system). Hudson is one of those exceptions, who decided to use both.


    The one problem with Windows laptop manufacturers, is that they mostly see their higher end laptops as 'gaming machines'. So, even though some of them have Pantone approved screens, the manufacturer's don't often say so on their websites. And, in the UK, the PC Vendors have the same blindspot. You want a powerful PC, = you want a gaming PC, so why would you want and/or need a colour calibrated screen? However, Apple grew up with the Creative Market, and understands the importance of a colour calibrated screen.


    You might never need to add an external GPU, but making sure that you have a firewire/top end USB C connection, would be good insurance. Some laptops also have removable panels, which allow you to install bigger and/or faster types of SSD drives and also more RAM, at home.


    Intel does not seem to be investing much in improving it's products. It is likely that Apple have done their homework, and the new generation of Apples will run much faster than the current Intel based generation. So, in the future, Windows machines might even be totally outclassed by Apple's products. But, I dread to think about the cost.

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  • Nitin Chandra

    For the occasional edit and management of photos, the GPU would not make any major difference IMO John Crowley. It would also be a learning curve moving to Windows after a Mac unless the person is already used to both. You will get more hardware on the Windows side for the same kind of cost, but, you would lose out on the trackpad/keyboard and above all, the screen.

    Personally, I have no issues using LR/PS on a 10-year-old iMac for the occasional edit and testing.

    The one thing you would want is 16 GB of RAM. If you have USB 3 ports on the laptop, the external SSDs will work fast enough to save on the internal SSD cost. In fact, I did the same with my new iMac...Plugged in a couple of 2 TB external SSDs instead of paying the Apple fees.

    I boot off and use the external SSDs only.

     

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  • David Price

    From first hand expereince, I disagree in part,  

    A large part of Photo Raw is designed to run in the GPU.   Photo Raw and PhotoShop are very different beasts.  I'd agree that Photoshop runs fine on CPU heavy machines, and that, (until recently at least), it does not need a graphics card.   But, Photo Raw is quite different.   It needs a graphics card.  If you try to run PR without a graphics card, then you are very likely to have a very buggy and crash prone experience. 

    Having said that your graphics card does not need to be particularly powerful.   I run my copy of PR on AMD's Integrated Graphics, and unlike Intel's, they are powerful enough.   But, it is commonsense when buying a laptop to consider if it will be possible to upgrade.  Over the years, as programmes have become more powerful, so I have maxed out the RAM and changed to SSD's.  And by doing so, I have kept a pair of elderly PCs running well.

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  • Gerry Whitmarsh

    I'm not so sure how much ON1 uses the GPU. If I look at Topaz DeNoise AI, it uses 90% - 100% of the GPU but I have never seen ON1 use much more than 2% - 4%. I have done all the things I should with the NVIDIA and Windows settings. Mind you I find the speed acceptable.

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  • Ray Miles

    Topaz products can be run in either CPU or GPU mode and can choose the optimum configuration for you. That's not the case with On1.

    Since upgrading to the top-of-the-range MacBook Pro I have noticed a slight increase in speed (although I rarely do complex layering) but it still crashes quite frequently.

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  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    I don't think the question should be how much is ON1 making use of the GPU but instead should be, does it have enough GPU when it needs it.

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  • John Crowley

    Now that the M1 Mac machines are out, is anyone here on the forum using PhotoRaw with a new MacBook air?  

    If not yet, would appreciate any comments about how PhotoRaw would perform with the new unified memory and processors ( CPU and GPU) from the M1.  Assuming a 16GB memory is required.

    thanks in advance

     

    John

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