Skip to main content

Slow Masking When Zooming - Again

Comments

7 comments

  • David Kick

    Richard, In Windows 11 you MUST go to the Windows graphics settings and set On1 to high performance.

    Check out my first comments on this thread.

    Heads up for Windows 11 users – ON1 Support (zendesk.com)

    0
  • Roger Gough

    This is probably a long shot, but just in case it helps...

    I have noticed zooming, panning, and masking can be very slow after the Dynamic Contrast filter has been applied. If you have used this filter, try disabling it while you do the rest of the editing. You don't need to delete the filter, just turn off the visibility by hitting the button to the left of the filter name. 

    When I do this, the slowness problem goes away, even for heavily edited photos with lots of different masks.

    0
  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    Seconded. Dynamic Contrast and Sharpening are both GPU intensive tasks as is brushing. Trying to render the DC while tracking the brushing can overwhelm less powerful GPUs. When you see lagging try lowering the Video Card Strength. I adjust it as needed while I'm editing. When I finish working on a photo that needed me to lower the strength, I reset it to high.

    This should also be less of a problem if those types of Effects are at the bottom of the stack. When editing something lower in the Editing Pipeline (see page 68 of the User Guide) those filters have to be re-rendered. If you are working above them I don't think they need to be re-rendered again.

    0
  • Richard Wise

    Thanks for the suggesions. I will give it a shoot.

     

    0
  • Richard Wise

    I have a NVIDA 2060 graphics card which is a pretty powerful.  With no Effects being used, I still have the problem whether I reduce the performance on the video card or not.  I'm using Perfect Brush and I don't know how to use the settings such as color threshold and transition.  

    0
  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    I'm using Perfect Brush and I don't know how to use the settings such as color threshold and transition.

    It took me a while to get a handle on this too. Transition controls the 'hardness' of the edge that is created by the mask. Lower settings give a harder edge with less bleed over into other areas the brush covers. Color Threshold controls the color sensitivity of what gets selected. Think of it like a color range selector.

    It just takes practice. Spend some time just using the tool without trying to do actual editing where you can run along a horizon with some trees sticking up into the sky. Take medium small strokes then adjust one setting and do it again alongside the first so you can compare the differences the setting change makes. A good way to see what's going on is to use a Luminosity Mask first, then turn on the Mask > View Mode > Grayscale selected. That will let you see the horizon edge and evaluate the changes made by the Perfect Brush.

    0
  • Brian Lawson Community moderator

    Under Preferences - System, I have Scratch & Cache Folders on my SSD.

    Is this an SSD dedicated to Photo RAW's Scratch space or is it the system's boot drive? If you're using the boot drive you should consider adding an SSD for the Scratch space. You'll see an improvement in performance. Search the Forums for SSD and performance for other topics where the rational for this has been explained in detail.

    0

Please sign in to leave a comment.